Extremely Hot Chilli Peppers

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FOR THE LOVE OF ALL THINGS CHILLI!

You might be well aware that the Scoville Scale and Scoville Heat Unit (SHU) were named after Wilbur Scoville in 1912.  This is used for measuring the chilli pepper’s pungency and heat. Chillies contain capsaicin, a compound that likely accounts for many of their health benefits. The high content of  vitamins A and C, have long been valued as a powerful immunity booster. 

From mild to extremely hot, chillies add zest and zing to any meal!  Be it Meditarranean, Mexican or even pure South African Rainbow Sensation-cooking.  I am sure that we have all experienced the zing of the chilli sting! 

Did you know that chillies belong to the same species and cross pollinate promiscuously with one another? If pollen from a hot pepper fertilizes the flower of a sweet pepper, all of the hot pepper genes from the father plant go into the embryo and the seed.  The fruits will all be edible but you never know what you'll get.

To prevent cross pollination, you would need to plant different varieties approximately 90 meter  or more apart. 

When space is limited and isolation by distance is not possible, you can physically isolate plants from each other through the use of isolation tents or blossom bags. 

Growing chillies can be quite tricky and drive you to tears, to say the least. Temperature is very important. A stable germination temperature of between 25 to 28 degrees celsius should suffice, but be sure to ensure that your seedlings are not subjected to temperatures exceeding 36 degrees celsius.

Browse our wide variety of suitable growing media to start your seeds and support your seedlings.


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